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Beer: A History of Suds and Civilization from Mesopotamia to Microbreweries by Gregg Smith (1995-12-01)

Rating Star 4 / 4 - 5 ( 1808)
Book Beer: A History of Suds and Civilization from Mesopotamia to Microbreweries by Gregg Smith (1995-12-01)

Beer: A History of Suds and Civilization from Mesopotamia to Microbreweries by Gregg Smith (1995-12-01)

Available in PDF - DJVU Format | Beer: A History of Suds and Civilization from Mesopotamia to Microbreweries by Gregg Smith (1995-12-01).pdf

 

Original name book: Beer: A History of Suds and Civilization from Mesopotamia to Microbreweries by Gregg Smith (1995-12-01)

Pages: Unknown

Language: Unknown

Publisher: Avon Books (P) (1751)

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Book details


Format *An electronic version of a printed book that can be read on a computer or handheld device designed specifically for this purpose. *Report a Broken Link

PDF
Required Software Any PDF Reader, Apple Preview
Supported Devices Windows PC/PocketPC, Mac OS, Linux OS, Apple iPhone/iPod Touch.
# of Devices Unlimited
Flowing Text / Pages Pages
Printable? Yes

Category - History

Bestsellers rank - 1 Rating Star

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Customer Reviews
  • By T. Burrows on February 4, 2010

    In this book, Gregg Smith puts together a compelling quick history of beer, from the dawn of civilization up until the early 1990s. The emphasis is on the development of beer in the U.S.A., with Europe and the rest of the world fading into the background. There is virtually nothing about the development of beer in Asia, Africa, Eastern Europe, and Latin America. But this does not mean that the book is not worthwhile. After a very interesting opening in which he discusses the development of beer in its earliest forms in the Middle East and North Africa, Smith moves on to Colonial America. He has a good eye for funny anecdotes (which is just as it should be) and for amusing quotes that serve as introductions to chapters. He generally covers the territory by region - New York, Boston, and Philadelphia get special attention. Then the story shifts to the big German immigration of the 1800s and the subsequent development of large-scale lager brewing in Saint Louis, Milwaukee, and elsewhere. There is some good coverage of the rise of alcohol prohibition and its subsequent defeat, and the dramatic impact that this had on brewers around the country. Brewing consolidated around several big companies thru the 1960s and 70s, and bland American lager reached its peak of dominance. Then, with the repeal of federal anti-homebrewing laws under President Carter and an increase in tourism, Americans tastes began to change, and the rise of the micro (or craft) brewers began. Smith does a decent, if somewhat bland, job of tracing the trajectories of many of the USA's major brewing outfits. This was an enjoyable and informative read. I am sure there is more to say on the subject, but this is a fine one to pop the cap on first. So cheers, Gregg Smith, and thanks.

  • By August P. Napotnik on May 4, 2015

    This book is very interesting. I wish it had been titled appropriately. Something like "Beer: A history of America". 28 pages of the 254 are dedicated to a few moments in history of beer and ancient civilization. Then for the remainder of the book we are in America. Don't get me wrong-- its all very fascinating and inspiring, but I was a little misled by the title of the book. My only other real complaint about this entertaining and educational read is that the author assumes a certain educated audience. I mean that he will state a brewing process or say the beer cost the man a penny. Well the reader might say to himself, how much was a penny worth during 1628? Keep google and a dictionary handy. Otherwise a good read.

  • By Michael Valdivielso on September 24, 2007

    Mr. Gregg Smith loves beer. He loves the history of beer, he loves the brewing of beer, and he loves the people who brew the beer. He guides us on the journey of time and space, from the birth of beer with the first hunter and gathers who loved it so much that they became farmers, to the English with their ales, to the Germans with their lagers, to the modern microbreweries and people who love to home brew. He digs right into hops and brewing sugars, he helps us visit greats events and happenings that took part within the inns and taverns of America. Great men drank and enjoyed their beers and ciders while planning out the course of world events. In fact the book was such a delight that I have already ordered a brewing kit and additional items to home brew some of my own beer.And I don't like beer. Weird, eh? I did have to take one point away. Mr. Gregg Smith knows his beer history but sometimes his general knowledge of history was shaky, outdated or just plain wrong. I would suggest any lover of history or any lover of beer to get this book.

  • By Donald Ford ([email protected]) on July 6, 2001

    From ancient Sumer to St. Louis, Missouri, from Charlemagne to Sam Adams, Gregg Smith's "Beer..." is the remarkable story of humanity viewed through a glass brightly - a celebratory romp through the ages, foaming steins in hand, for all those who cherish their malted barley brew. Even though this is a very entertaining & informative book, Michael Jackson is still the bibliophonic God of beer. Like suds? Read it!

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